Lunches with Artists

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A series of lunches + conversations with artists, sponsored by Tin Drum Cafe http://tindrumcafe.com/ http://gyunhur.com

Contributors

gyunhur
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  • July 16, 2013 12:33 am

    Lunch #4 with Mark Wentzel

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    Mark Wentzel was my former professor and a thesis advisor at the Savannah College of Art and Design. His sharp ideas and inputs to architecturally frame my thesis work continue to be essential in ways I think about my own practice. 

    His wife, Jen who also is an artist, and Mark have invited me over for dinners a few times and have offered generous spirit of conversations and life. Out of curiosity of where he was with his work and ideas, I invited him to participate in this lunch project, and he welcomed it. I was quite excited.

    imagexlounge (2006) #markwentzel

    Formerly known with his chair piece “XLounge”, Wentzel’s works wrestle with this idea of functionality and aesthetics of art objects, addressing relevant social issues for us to ponder. His show at the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center “Morale Hazard” (2009) also questioned this hypothetic/real situation of collapses of systems that we constructed for ourselves. To read more about “Morale Hazard,” here is an Art 21 blog regarding Mark Wentzel’s work. http://blog.art21.org/2009/05/27/holla-from-hotlanta/

    image#moralehazard (2009) #markwentzel #acac

    When I asked Mark what food to bring, he had one of the simplest requests - coconut soup and spring rolls. I got to his house and he led me to downstairs studio. We crowded a small table with bowls and wrapped spring rolls and started to eat. Mark quickly started the conversation regarding this idea of ‘food’ as a diffuser amongst relationships built with other artists. This constant social negotiation, unless stemmed out of early friendship, with other individuals can be a tricky thing. I think that’s why we need to eat together often like family would. 

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    #springrolls #coconut soup

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    Gyun Hur (GH): Your point regarding ‘food’ is interesting. You mentioned how ‘food’ becomes a diffuser in a sense amongst people since it is an accessible denominator. In a sense, that is why I love eating with people, something so instinctive about food while we may be conversing regarding our emotional and intellectual ideas. We, artists, are interesting - yes, we have this strange relationship with our own ‘ego’s and finding ourselves to navigate in the midst of this art world can be trying, rewarding, heart breaking, and enriching. Anyways, could you talk a little more about your project with food and community in Detroit? Even just drawn as an idea on a map, I find it really interesting.

    Mark Wentzel (MW): Yeah, food is good stuff. Perhaps because food is highest on the list of basic human needs and the preparation (cooking) of food has a lot to do with our evolution as the dominant species (for better or worse) it makes sense that when it’s sort of put in the position of social currency it works well. Acquisition of taste, nutrition, palate refinement and all that aside…maybe food is that third voice in the conversation that keeps things in perspective relative to basic necessity. In some cultures the phrase “have you eaten” is used in the same way as Americans would say, “how are you doing.” This makes a lot of sense. Besides, you can’t monopolize a conversation so much when your mouth is stuffed with chicken confit, or chicken feet, or chick-fil-A. So my proposal for a specific neighborhood in Detroit uses food as form of creative currency. It’s more of a curatorial concept than an individual art idea that brings people together, in a rough but promising area of the world, over food to generate creative ideas. But more later on that…hopefully.

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    Precise design series of his zodiac animal device caught my attention, which led us to converse regarding functionality vs. aesthetics more intensively.

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    GH: This idea of “vice vs. virtue” and how ‘vs’ exists as in-between-er deeply permeates in your work. Your series of sculptures and designs suggest this wrestling between functionality and mere aesthetics and existence as pure sculpture. As a sculptor, as more of a maker rather than a romantic dweller in an image (yes, did we not refer that to painters - ), you are engaging this process as a conceptual thinker and a physical maker. Could you elaborate more on this idea, especially regarding your vice (12 zodiac animal series?)

    MW: What I like about the phrase vice versus virtue beyond quaint alliteration is that while it normally sets up a relationship of opposites, good vs. bad, it can also be a sequence of almost synonymous terms. All three of these terms can act as comparatives, by virtue of this, in vice of that, this versus that, setting up an opportunity for neutrality rather than polarity. So the bench vice as a physical sculptural object came to mind as a mitigating form, sort of like the nail fetishes in the Congo of African, that has a certain diffusive agency.  When realized these will be large scale, functional cast iron works representing seven of the twelve signs of the Chinese zodiac. They are interpretations of the bronze fountainheads created by the 17th Century Italian missionary Giuseppe Castiglione for the Qianlong Emperor at the Old Summer Palace, the ones that Ai Wei Wei replicated recently…from there the story gets a little more complicated. (insert mouthful of cantonese noodles).image

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    After talking intensively about this urgency about wanting to finding an ‘answer’ in our act of making, I took some time taking a look at his sketches. This particular space of Mark’s was filled with sketches, graphic mottos, and writings for projects to be actualized. And these notably recognizable structures were to be built, positioned in contexts that would reverse their assumed functionality, asking questions back to the audience of what we are looking at. “Objects” in public space allow works to be accessible - and this accessibility, this democratic way of accessing works and ideas is important to Mark, important to me. And in that idea, we dwelled a bit conversing. 

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    GH: Your space, in a way, your entire house is fragmented/divided in an interesting way. Even this basement studio space is in a way full of layers. Entrance is a guest room sort, and this current sitting space in which you share with your son August and a lot of your sketches and texts exist. And then behind a black curtain, there is a physical space with tools and machines which you share with Jen. And then the space leads to a bigger space outside. Your way of structuring this (as it is still evolving) architecture in a way hints me the way that you are processing ideas - framing ideas, problem solving situations, negotiating relationships, etc.

    MW: My spaces, I guess is more accurate. Partly due to circumstance, but yeah, I have a very compartmentalized work environment. I think this is probably pretty analogous to how my brain works, but it also accommodates different aspects of my work, computer rendering, idea generation, small and larger scale fabrication, studying, along with my family life. These different rooms, I guess five in all, each play a different role in thinking about and making art, but they also allow me to integrate my family relationships, my wife is a clay artist and my son has enjoyed laying some pretty serious marks down on a stack of matt board scraps. Yes, so we have a bunch of independent spaces, each a work in progress in itself.

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    We also talked about August (Mark’s son)’s paintings, his incredible brush marks. As an artist, to be a parent and see much part of yourself in your child… must be an incredible thing. 

    With the simplest set of food (a small bowl of coconut soup and spring rolls), we had perhaps the most complex conversation about what actually ‘making’ means to us artists - makers and thinkers. And a deep concern how art is supposed to function in the midst of our normality was apparent in his work and thoughts. And perhaps Steve Aishman’s text regarding Mark’s show “Morale Hazard” echoes exactly that:

    " Subsequently, his gallery talk was filled with people who had largely diverse interest, like people who were interested in art, people who only wanted to talk about the economy and some people who were just interested in muscles cars."

    - Steve Aishman, “A Report From Phantom Zone,” Big Red and Shiny

    Cannot wait to see his next project in person. Thank you, Mark, for making time to share your thoughts and studio space and also the most thoughtful words for this blog post. Thank you, Tin Drum Cafe, for free lunch for us and a gift card!

    Next artist is Yana Dimitrova who moved to NYC from Atlanta after her schooling. It is going to be another good one! Stay tuned -

    - G.

  • July 10, 2013 10:34 am

    Lunch #3 with Namwon Choi

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    I met Namwon Choi when I was in my junior year at the University of Georgia. She recently had moved to the States then, and one of my professors introduced us to each other, just merely because we both were ‘Korean - women - art - students.’ And he was not too off in his projection of how we would connect.

    We usually meet over meals to catch up on things as friends and artists, and this was a good opportunity for me to actually visit her studio and intentionally talk about her practice. 

    Currently, Namwon is a MFA candidate at Georgia State University. Past two and half years, her figurative paintings have been forming in ways that are more physical, and perhaps less literal. She is battling with yes, ‘physicality’ of painting and imagery of figures. In the midst, her insertion of materials like broken mirrors, glass panels, and copper plate becomes another form of painting that depicts a different dimensionality.

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    After a playful entrance to her studio with my Tin Drum lunch bag (see the video post below), I gasped as I entered  her studio. 

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    "Oh shit!"

    That was my first reaction. 

    Something intense and grueling was going on in her studio. Confrontational eyes, physical marks, wings, and shadows in her paintings were about to just burst at me.

    image#masamancurry #rice

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    "Let’s eat!"

    We quickly opened our lunch bowls - Mango Stir-Fry and Masaman Curry this time. I like noodles, but you cannot really go wrong with rice and some good savory sauce on top. We finished the food pretty quickly.

    When I shared about this artist project idea with Namwon, she bursted out in laughter. She said, “it’s brilliant! You should subtitle the project, ‘Does art feed you?’” 예술이 밥 먹여주냐?

    There is a saying “예술이 밥 먹여주냐? Does art feed you?” in Korean. It is a sarcastic saying that being an artist is not a practical, sensible choice. Typical parents would tell their children exactly that.

    She is right. I should subtitle it that - 

    So the conversation started with a usual this and that as friends would talk. It was, in fact, challenging for me to put our lunch in context of me really getting to know Namwon’s work. Often, I would alter our conversation saying, “so… your painting there…”

    And here it goes - a few things we talked about!

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    Gyun Hur (GH): Namwon, in the past few years of your MFA pursuit, I have seen your paintings evolve. Let me trace back to your thesis in Korea. Although I never saw your older paintings in person, your figurative paintings in print struck me as something that was familiar (we understand figures, and each figure was stacked up to create a landscape sort), yet your fused techniques and aesthetic sensibilities were quite provocative. I see that same provocativeness in your current paintings as well. One thing that stands out to me is an intensity of ‘gaze’ that you depict through eyes in your paintings. That particular painting is quite confrontational with your eyes pinched. Could you elaborate more on that?

    Namwon Choi (NC): Now, who would have guessed the word ‘provocativeness’ can be applied on my paintings?  I mean do they really go together even? What I mean by that is, it’s a surprise, a nice surpirse that something that I would have never guessed or intended … and from that point, the conversation begins. The gaze painting, I titled it ” - o ” which means below zero, below ground level as a metaphor of whom I am now. Also as an Asian woman artist in America, inevitably certain reading of me is applied and it will be. I had no control or choice on the appearance that I was given, so here I am, take it world!

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    The conversation goes on. 

    One thing that I appreciate about having Namwon around as a friend and an artist colleague is that we can talk about specific struggles as a minority woman artist. Again and again, I run into pre-assumptions and expectations from others, outside of my understanding and intention, and I find that limiting and frustrating at times. I find that African-American artists are really refining their voice as artists with references of the past and present, yet we Asians do not talk about our struggles much. We do not know how to talk about it. Really. Namwon and I attempted -

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    GH: We talked about ‘feminism’ in a sense that could be relevant to contemporary young women of colors. And as I remember, our conclusion regarding these specific frustrations of being women, being specifically ‘oriental’ women - that it perhaps gives us more room to have empathy and understanding. What have been specific struggles for you as you enter more intensively in this art world? What do you find in your paintings, a spiritual revelation sort (as we talked about)?

    NC: Well, first of all, it is too early for me to say what my experience as an Asian woman artist in the contemporary art world is about. It is more like a ‘life hits you with a brick’ experience, I would say. And so as a woman, we take that as a ‘women-only-matter.’ However, I recently realize it is not. Everybody is dealing and fighting on his/her own battle. Thankfully, I am from a country overcoming a tremendous hardship and the spirit of it runs in my blood. I am fighting my own battle soley in my studio everyday and if that is called as ‘one to one combat,’ or a ‘confession,’ that would be fairly well described. 

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    GH: I want to specifically ask you about the painting of your hair and scalp. It is revealing in a sense that you are exposing perhaps one of most unseen and vulnerable parts of your body that is not literal - a top of your scalp?! And each hair strand is divided in a way as if fingers (figuratively) were trying to find a way that hair was supposed to fall… it is quite a beautiful painting. Could you tell me a little more about this painting?

    NC: The scalp painting is my interpretation of Van Gogh’s “Wheatfield with Crows.” My reading of that particular painting was that the wheat field was not just there dumbly waited to feed the crows, yet the power of the germination of each tiny grain scares the crows away, as if exorcising demons. So one morning, I brushed my hair as I always do and I realized that act (‘everything is going to be alright act’, if you will), a patting on my head with my own fingers as if my mom did when I was little, was somehow very comforting. So I parted my hair just like the path in the middle of the Wheatfield in the Van Gogh painting and all of sudden, the color contrast of the scalp and dark hair seemed like yelling at me, ‘Do a painting!’

    GH: Your paintings are teasing the audience in a way where paintings become a sculptural dimension that creates a shadow. That is quite powerful while perhaps it diminishes the image? Painting at the end of the day is meant for an optical illusion for us to believe in an alternative reality, and you are creating this shadow that distorts that idea.

    NC: I like it when my paintings get challenged (in other words, dealing with limitations) by the excitement from the making of different objects with different materials. It is difficult to achieve the presence of three dimensional art work gives in painting. No matter how hard I try to make a hole on canvas, it is a still flat canvas. So I borrowed an old Chinese shadow puppet show idea by painting images on a clear glass and let the painted images cast their shadow. That way, painting becomes beyond two dimensional as if it takes you to where you can sense more than what has painted. These are hands painted on a a clear glass linked and connected ever so tightly, but look again, they are wings!

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    and there, I surely saw wings.

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    Thank you, Namwon, for making time for this conversation, and thank you Tin Drum Cafe for sponsoring our lunch and also giving the artist a gift card!!!

    Next artist is Mark Wentel. Stay tuned!

    - G.

  • July 9, 2013 10:59 pm

    I know I know, I’m a bit behind with Lunch #3 post, this never ending struggle with consistency as a procrastinating artist blogger! -_-;;

    Here is a video clip on my way to Namwon’s studio.

    Lunch #3 with Namwon Choi coming soon!!!

    - G. 

  • June 26, 2013 10:51 am

    Lunch #2 with Katherine Taylor

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    "So how is it being back to your studio? It took me awhile to get back to the normality of my life back in Atlanta, but it’s been good. So good to see you again, Katherine."

    Katherine and I hugged as I was entering her studio with a bag of Tin Drum noodles. 

    Katherine Taylor, Atlanta-based painter, and I spent a month of May at the Vermont Studio Center (VSC). While we were aware of each other’s works and presence, this residency was the first time we got to know each other as artists and friends over meals, drinks, and studio visits.

    Her body of work subtly evokes an inevitable fragility of landscape, time, and memory. Collapsing landscapes, whether natural or man-made, create a haunting space that hook the viewer’s eyes and emotions deeper into her paintings. When I saw a few small studies of her ‘swimming pools,’ at VSC, I could not stopping thinking about them. I thought to myself, ‘there is something deeper in that space. Katherine’s paintings want me to stay in that space…’ I wondered to myself, ‘isn’t it strange that that empty space seems to hold so much, something very familiar inside of me?’

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    #studies #swimming pool #space #collapse

     

    I pulled out the Tin Drum noodle bowls and we immediately started talking and eating. Spending a month together at a residency where we ate together all the time, it was natural. We knew how this was supposed to roll.

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    image#pad woon sen noodle with chicken (thailand)  #katherine’s lunch

    image#sing chow men noodle (singapore)  #gyun’s lunch

    Gyun Hur (GH): Katherine, this idea of ‘space’ is very captivating and almost provocative in your paintings in my opinion. Could you tell me a little bit about your obsession with reconstructing this space, a sense of permanence vs. impermanence in your work?

    Katherine Taylor (KT): I am obsessed with the implications of memory in perception of space, and how individual emotions and experiences may shape the way we negotiate our environments. I can see this in the landscape when permanence is desired to solidify something ever changing. I think this intersection between constructed and deconstructed spaces are human responses to controlling or accepting impermanence.

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    As we were almost swallowing the noodles (I was a little hungry), our conversation continued. We talked about our experiences at Vermont Studio Center, recapturing our time there that was not purely the studio-based enlightenments. We both had to acknowledge that the environment at the residency pushed our sense of privacy and social negotiations. So much of our projection of ourselves and others play a role in functioning as a being, and I had some confessions to make, and so did she. 

    It was interesting to find out that Radcliffe Bailey and Katherine Taylor went to Atlanta College of Art around the same time. So did Christina Price Washington who is also a close friend and a wonderful artist I know. 

    What is it about that time and environment that produced these distinctive artists that I know of? I mean, Kara Walker also went to ACA around that time, as everyone knows, and I became very curious about that time and schooling. Imagine all these artists as 20 somethings, hanging out in their classes. 

    GH: We talked a lot about this idea of ‘becoming an individual artist’ that was engrained in you as a young art student at Atlanta College of Art (ACA). It means that no matter what the outside force and pressure may be, that you learn to secure yourself as an artist with a drive and vision. It may mean that you become assured that you yourself have more than enough sources within you for what it takes to be an artist. What are those drive and resourse in your work?

    KT: Well, it is true. I think that ACA did an amazing job of ensuring our little artist psyches were well individuated. And for myself, I spent a number of years developing my practice out of the sheer pleasure of learning more and know more, so my investment in art making was not completely solipsistic. Having said that, I return to this core awareness of puzzling over how I know what I know, since it’s so dependent on perception, especially when reality and experience are incongruent in image.

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    We talked for hours. Near the end of our talk, I asked Katherine about her relationship to a studio space.

    GH: Your sensibility of ‘space’ seems to permeate in your studio space as well. From our conversation, it almost feels like your entire studio space becomes a physical manifestation of your psyche, which then becomes incredibly private. Could you share about your relationship to your studio space and how your residency experience allowed you to redefine what that studio space means to you?

    KT: Well, I had a lot of time to prepare fo my stay at VSC, so I was able to whittle down what was necessary and portable. As a result, I had to also be comfortable with this notion of leaving my actual studio behind in order to rebuild it in another place. That all sounds terribly dramatic, and it was funny for me, too, because I was consciously trying to make it an easy transition. That all being said, I suppose the “studio” for me is really a state of mind. And of course, as you mentioned, I think that is present when I am in the space. In other words, the boundaries, rigor, discipline, and respect for art making are what you carry with you.

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    Katherine Taylor is currently working on her next exhibition with The Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia (MOCA GA) as a fellow of The Working Artist Project (WAP).

    To view some of her works, go to:

    Katherine Taylor  http://www.ktaylor.net/

    Marcia Wood Gallery

    http://www.marciawoodgallery.com/artist/taylor_katherine/intro.html

    Thank you, Katherine, for making time for this project and Tin Drum Cafe for free lunches!

    Next lunch is with Namwon Choi, a 3rd year MFA candidate at Georgia State University. Stay tuned!

    - Gyun

  • June 25, 2013 9:26 am

    Lunch #1 with Radcliffe Bailey

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    Last week, I called Radcliffe Bailey, my former professor at the University of Georgia, and asked him, “so what would you like for lunch?” Radcliffe quickly replied, “oh you know… anything is fine, really.”

    Radcliffe Bailey's name holds an immediate weight. Throughout his career of art making, Radcliffe has been creating visual lyrics of his people, history, and myth in forms of painting, sculpture, and installation. Radcliffe's work reveals one of the most sensitive and poignant grasp regarding specific context of black history and Atlanta.  Deeply rooted in his community, friends and family whom he grew up with, Radcliffe resides in Atlanta with his studio and house. I visited his studio for first time right after my undergraduate, and as a 20 year old something, I remember being in awe of scale and sophistication of his space.

    I was now back in his studio again with a bag of Tin Drum noodles. I really had no specific agenda other than eating and conversing with him.

    "So… hey, what do you need me to do? Do you need me to pull some works out or something?"

    "Oh no. We are gonna just eat and talk. Is that ok?" 

    "Oh, yea. Let me pull out some bowls then."

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    The specific choice of what I may bring for lunch did not seem to matter so much to him. So I ordered in two noodles: Pad Thai and Cantonese Noodle. We sat down and awkwardly opened the lunch bowls and started eating. I kept in touch with him in the past years and would catch up over casual coffee sips, but this constructed setting of ‘eating together’ was something that we both had to warm up to. Eventually we started to talk as we normally would.

    "So what are you up to?" Radcliffe asks. 

    "Oh, you know…"

    I talked about past few months of traveling and working, attempting… and realized from our conversation that such ‘an attempt,’ this transient and mobile navigation between projects and people is just a continual thing, it’s not just an emerging artist’s status of ‘I’m trying to figure out.

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    Our lunch lasted about 3 hours. 

    Really, it was a long conversation over due wrestling with ideas of art making, business of art, residencies, names of black thinkers and artists like James Baldwin, a new landscape of the city Atlanta in its demographics and food, my father, his father, my nephew and his children, travels and friendship, flying to Milan to just walk and talk with a dear friend, coming back to Atlanta to negotiate your role and responsibilities, galleries, New York City, Hong Kong, music, democracy, 80s, white flight, immigrating, moving, growing up, Atlanta College of Art, High, people, general public, accessibility of arts and culture, infrastructure, fragmentation (or segregation), race that matters, identity of the city,  curators who are friends, artists and more artists, San Diego, The Heat and the Spurs, observance… on and on.

     

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    #black artists #black thinkers #contemporary african art

     

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    #race #community #role

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    #hat #pride #presence

    At the end, I asked Radcliffe -

    "So I will be doing this next few months, bringing lunch boxes to artists’ studio space, that space that may be sacred and private to them. Or it could be otherwise. I want to be sensitive to that as I visit each studio, you know… what is that ‘studio space’ for you?"

    "Ah… it is where I can sit and think and ponder. Where I can put things, where I can lay my books. It’s wherever I go. I get to a hotel and open my watercolor set and make that into my little studio. It cannot really leave you."

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    Here is a beautiful article regarding Radcliffe Bailey’s work and context.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/03/arts/design/high-museum-in-atlanta-shows-radcliffe-baileys-art.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

    Lunch #2 is with Katherine Taylor. Stay tuned!

    - Gyun

  • June 24, 2013 12:11 pm

    Coffee with Steven Chan

    Steven Chan, the owner of Tin Drum Asiacafe, and I started to get to know each other through my galleriest, Lloyd Benjamin (Get This! Gallery). He has a genuine interest in artists and their creative practice, and he has been an active entrepreneur, an art collector, and a patron past years in Atlanta. When I proposed the idea of “Lunches with Artists” project, Steven delightfully agreed to sponsor the project with meals for artists! I was surprised by such an easy ‘yes’ to support this project, yet his reply to my thanks was, “it is my honor to serve artists. Thank you!”

    Steven and I met up for a short coffee last Friday in midtown Atlanta. We had a great conversation regarding the project, artists, Atlanta, his business, my evolving career as an artist, art as an economic unit, family, relationships, and more. I e-mailed him with a few questions for this blog, and here it is!

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    Gyun Hur (GH): Steven, thank you so much for offering to sponsor this lunch project with artists. They have enjoyed to-go boxes from Tin Drum and I have had wonderful conversations with the artists over these lunches. When I proposed the idea, you were so delighted that you could take a part of encouraging and helping artists. When did that interest of art and artists start for you?

    Steven Chan (SC): In thinking through this question, trying to understand my relationship with art, I recognize that art is an effect, a substance, if you will. It lives inside of me, since birth. With artists, once I developed the ability to see and listen; and realized they are the ones who make art, I became extremely interested in them. They are the makers of this substance.

    GH: In what ways do you find art as an essential part of your life?

    SC: As explained above, it’s a vital substance for me. More importantly, I see art and beauty in all things, whether it’s a towering tree or a CAT-5 wall jack. I am blessed they surround me.

    GH: Could you tell me a little bit about your background, starting of Tin Drum and how you are operating as an entrepreneur and an art patron?

    SC: I love architecture and design. I know how to build. That’s how I became a restauranteur. With Tin Drum, it was partly my channel of showing my deepest appreciation of my life long teacher, David Sylvian, of shaping me. I want to work so I can support artists, like anyone who works to support their family. It’s a simple and necessary idea.

    GH: What drives you to pursue what you pursue and establish relationships both in your career and life?

    SC: Same desire that drives an artist to pursue the realization of an interpretation of an idea. I embrace every precious second with anyone I am lucky enough to cross path with, stranger or not.

    GH: What is your favorite dish at Tin Drum?

    SC: All of them, because as a whole they represent the idea of Tin Drum Asiacafe: that we are here for everyone, young or old, rich or poor, not-right and not-wrong.

    Thank you, Steven and Tin Drum Cafe, for sponsoring this project!

  • June 24, 2013 10:40 am
    "Lunches with Artists" project is a series of lunches and conversations with artists in Atlanta, sponsored by Tin Drum Cafe. As an extension of my project “Stay Here in Atlanta” in 2011 funded by Idea Capital, I will be bringing lunches to artists’ studio space and converse with them regarding their art making, life, and food. The project is to foster dialogues amongst artists with no guards by sharing a meal.
This thread of conversations, artists, and food will continue next few months sponsored by Tin Drum Cafe. Upcoming list of artists are:
Radcliffe Bailey
Katherine Taylor
Namwon Choi
Mark Wentzel


Stay tuned!


- Gyun View high resolution

    "Lunches with Artists" project is a series of lunches and conversations with artists in Atlanta, sponsored by Tin Drum Cafe. As an extension of my project “Stay Here in Atlanta” in 2011 funded by Idea Capital, I will be bringing lunches to artists’ studio space and converse with them regarding their art making, life, and food. The project is to foster dialogues amongst artists with no guards by sharing a meal.

    This thread of conversations, artists, and food will continue next few months sponsored by Tin Drum Cafe. Upcoming list of artists are:

    Radcliffe Bailey

    Katherine Taylor

    Namwon Choi

    Mark Wentzel

    Stay tuned!

    - Gyun